A short film about a Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus and a traveler who encroached on its territory. Want to become a Tree Octopus Activist? The Endangered Tree Octopus of the Pacific Northwest is a fun hoax for students to learn about how to identify reputable resources for research. The giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini, formerly also Octopus apollyon), also known as the North Pacific giant octopus, is a large marine cephalopod belonging to the genus Enteroctopus.Its spatial distribution includes the coastal North Pacific, along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, Japan, and Korean Peninsula. The giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini, formerly also Octopus apollyon), also known as the North Pacific giant octopus, is a large marine cephalopod belonging to the genus Enteroctopus. (Octopus paxarbolis) is its scientific name (definitely fake). There was just one problem: it was all a hoax, a work of fiction created by Lyle Zapato. “Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus”: a hoax revisited. The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus decline might seem like a mystery at first. Being from the Pacific Northwest, I couldn't resist the idea of forest and sea life merging. The katakana-transliterated English name is used exclusively for the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus whereas 木のタコ may be used for tree octopuses in general. Great for chiding motorists! The possibility of Pacific Northwest tree octopus extinction is not an unwarranted fear. In a 2006 study by the University of Connecticut, seventh graders lacked the ability to discredit a hoax website about a tree octopus. They cover an interesting topic that makes people interested through curiosity. There website is… Tree octopuses have eyesight comparable to humans. We must have the ability to judge and examine the informations we use. Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Lesson Plan Worksheet PART 2 The website Look carefully at the Northwest Pacific tree octopus site. You will find this specie in the high trees of Washington's Olympic National forest in the Northwest Pacific. Together, we have the power to build a grass-roots campaign to save the Tree Octopus! This fictitious endangered species of cephalopod was given the Latin name "Octopus paxarbolis" (the species name being coined from Latin pax, the root of Pacific, and Spanish arbol meaning "tree"). Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. A short film about a Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus and a traveler who encroached on its territory. Facts about Octopus While efforts were made in the past to preserve remaining tree octopus habitat, these were met with resistance by the timber industry, which has traditionally viewed the tree octopus as a nuisance, both because the octopuses favor the valuable, moss-shrouded trees of old growth forests—pitting conservation needs against lucrative sources of lumber—and because octopuses hiding among felled trees often gummed up sawmills and stained pulp vats with their ink. It is said that the Pacific NW Tree Octopus lives in the Olympic National park but in reality, since it is a fake, it lives nowhere since it does not exist at all. How do they specifically help the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus? The size record is held by a specimen that was 30 feet across and weighed more than 600 pounds. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. (The magazine publishers depended on cheap paper made from wood pulp and were glad to contribute to the anti-octopus propaganda campaign of the timber industry.). Enter your e-mail address for things to do, restaurants to try and much more! Like other species of octopus, they… More Tree Octopus Information Tree Octopus FAQs — Frequently asked questions, now with answers. Its major predator w… In fact, the Pacific Northwest tree octopus was used by researchers at the University of Connecticut to test the internet literacy of middle-school students in a 2006 study. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. Ever heard of the Pacific Northwest tree octopus? Of course, currently, we are all exposed to misinformation that ends up duping us now and then. In fact, the website is so well done that it has been used in internet literary tests, where students are asked to research the tree octopus and often report the site (https://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/) as very credible. The creature was given the scientific name Octopus paxarbolis which means ‘octopus of the Pacific tree’. Given recent events, it's a lesson that is perhaps more important now than ever before. Its habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal in Washington State, provides sufficient moisture for survival as well as protection from predators, including humans. This site is not associated with any school or educational organization, The author of this web site catches the attention of the reader with their subject matter. Love Washington? Since then, it has become famous and is used by teachers to educate children about fact … Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus! Not to be confused with the Pacific Northwest Octopus Tree. I am going to show some of the proof I found by quoting it. First, we’ll start with the facts. Neither had a group of Connecticut seventh graders who, when presented with a convincing website detailing the habits of this extraordinary creature, concluded that the site was “credible” and that such an animal existed. The reasons for this dire situation include: decimation of habitat by logging and suburban encroachment; building of roads that cut off access to the water which it needs for spawning; predation by foreign species such as house cats; and booming populations of its natural predators, including the bald eagle and sasquatch. Here are five interesting facts about them: With an arm span of up to 6 metres and a weight of about 50 kg, the giant Pacific octopus is the largest species of octopus in the world. Show your support for the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus by placing a Tentacle Ribbon or badge—along with a link to the PNWTO page so people can learn more—on your website or blog. Feb 13, 2019 - Rumor: Internet plea calls for saving the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus, which can live on both land and water. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus is a fictional species that was dreamt up by a Washington-based author named Lyle Zapato in 1998. story talks about “The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) [that] can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America”, an endangered species that needs to be saved (Zapato). Besides allowing them to see their prey and environment, it helps them in inter-octopus relations. The creature was given the scientific name Octopus paxarbolis which means ‘octopus of the Pacific tree’. Or: how vulnerable are school children to Fake News? It is thought to originate from the Puget Sound but it won't have originated from anywhere at all. Who are the tree frog's predators? Turn up your volume and listen to this presentation about the pacific northwest tree octopus. The giant Pacific octopus grows bigger and lives longer than any other octopus species. Tree octopus species, including the endangered Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus, are some of the most elusive creatures known to Man. Design/methodology/approach – Replication of a US empirical study in the Netherlands to examine whether Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus was said to live high in the trees of Washington State's Olympic National Forest and spend their early lives in the water of Puget Sound, but as they mature they move upwards, adopting an arboreal existence. But this “ridiculous” legend, widely thought to be a hoax, is still debated in certain circles. Northwest Tree Octopus. Chameleon-like, giant Pacific octopuses can change their appearance to mimic rocks and highly patterned coral. Tree Octopus is said to be found in the high trees of the forest in the Northwest Pacific. Today I want to write about a really cool octopus, the giant Pacific octopus. This quoting is from a Wikipedia search. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus is an Internet hoax created in 1998 by a humor writer under the pseudonym Lyle Zapato. While fortunately this practice has been outlawed, its effects still reverberate today as these millinery deprivations brought tree octopus numbers below the critical point where even minor environmental change could cause disaster. This fictitious endangered species of cephalopod was given the Latin name "Octopus paxarbolis" (the species name being coined from Latin pax, the root of Pacific, and Spanish arbol meaning "tree"). Get more stories delivered right to your email. Jessica Wick is a writer and travel enthusiast who loves exploring new places, meeting new people and, of course, beautiful Big Sky Country and every part of Washington State. The history of the tree octopus trade is a sad one. You'll receive your first newsletter soon! Using the same website in this qualitative study, 68 elementary students shared rationales about The Pacific Northwest tree octopus or Octopus paxarbolis is a rare arboreal cephalopod with a range which stretches from California to British Columbia, with a concentration in the Olympic National Forest. The page in question was devoted to an animal called the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. The female will guard and care for her eggs until they hatch, refusing even to eat, and usually dying from her selflessness. I excitedly tree octopus.) Better (or worse) yet, it had vision as good as a human being's. Why is the Tree Octopus endangered? Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus Lesson Plan Aim: Students analyse and learn about spoof websites. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus A few years ago a little-known animal species suddenly made headlines. hawks, snakes, and natural causes. The tree octopus can feed on a variety of prey including large insects and … The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is an Internet hoax created by Lyle Zapato, a Washington-based author and Web publisher, in 1998. Can you hold a tree octopus? Turn up your volume and listen to this presentation about the pacific northwest tree octopus. Its spatial distribution includes the coastal North Pacific , along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, Japan, and Korean Peninsula. "The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rain forests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast … The Pacific Northwest tree octopus is an Internet hoax created in 1998 by a humor writer under the pseudonym Lyle Zapato. These nuisances led many loggers to regard tree octopuses as bad luck, resulting in the pointless killing of octopuses on sight at logging camps in a misguided attempt at eradicating the troublesome species. Read 8 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Danny Novo / Flickr The octopus, or Octopus Paxarbolis as it was called, was allegedly found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula. After this, you with want to save it too. The initial (false) premise of the lesson is that students are learning to use online research to gather evidence, formulate an opinion, and take steps to contact elected officials. After the male has deposited his sperm, he returns to the forests, leaving the female to find an aquatic lair in which to attach her strands of egg-clusters. Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. They are well known to change their color according to the environment and mood. This fictitious endangered species of cephalopod was given the Latin name "Octopus paxarbolis" (the species name being coined from Latin pax, the root of Pacific, and Spanish arbol meaning "tree"). This fictitious endangered species of cephalopod was purportedly able to live both on land and in water, and was said to live in the Olympic National Forest and nearby rivers, spawning in water where its eggs are laid. These solitary cephalopods reach an average size (measured from arm-tip to mantle-tip,) of 30-33 cm. Purpose – This paper proposes a New Literacies approach to get insight into young people’s capability to detect Fake News. Besides this, Tree Octopus is also considered as an intelligent creature because they … First of all, the only octopuses in the world live in aquatic habitats. In 1998, Lyle Zapato created an online campaign called Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. 2. Together, we have the power to build a grass-roots campaign to save the Tree Octopus! Reaching out with one of her eight arms, each covered in sensitive suckers, a tree octopus might grab a branch to pull herself along in a form of locomotion called tentaculation; or she might be preparing to strike at an insect or small vertebrate, such as a frog or rodent, or steal an egg from a bird's nest; or she might even be examining some object that caught her fancy, instinctively desiring to manipulate it with her dexterous limbs (really deserving the title "sensory organs" more than mere "limbs",) in order to better know it. "The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus is an internet hoax created in 1998 by Lyle Zapato. Given recent events, it's a lesson that is perhaps more important now than ever before. The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America.Their habitat lies on the eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal.These solitary cephalopods reach an average size (measured from arm-tip to mantle-tip,) of 30 … You can notice them jumping from one tree to another with the help of their arms. Do the pictures provided of the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus on the About, as well as the Sightings page, appear to be legitimate? These solitary cephalopods reach an average size (measured from arm-tip to mantle-tip,) of 30-33 cm. Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. In many ways the Pacific Northwest tree octopus serves as a reminder of how easy it is for false information to spread online - whether it be political claims or stories of strange creatures. The charming but elusive Tree Octopus became the focal point of internet scrutiny. These creatures supposedly begin their lives like any other octopus, as an egg in the water. So for this week’s fun facts corner, I thought I’d share some fun facts about these interesting marine creatures.… The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. Adaptations its ancestors originally evolved in the three dimensional environment of the sea have been put to good use in the spatially complex maze of the coniferous Olympic rainforests. legalresearchplus.com The Future of Reading and Researching the Pacific Northwest tree octopus | Legal Research Plus Leu, who researches literacy and technology at … The tree octopus actually preferred the rainforest because of its temperate environment, apparently. As mentioned, the tree octopus has been suggested to live in forests, mainly the Olympic National Forests. The Pacific Northwest tree octopus (Octopus paxarbolis) can be found in the temperate rainforests of the Olympic Peninsula on the west coast of North America. Read all about the mysterious Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus here. For the past few years, this aquarium has an entire week dedicated to these cephalopods and will have all sorts of events to celebrate! Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus claims the species is at risk due to low population numbers. Discover Octopus Tree of Oregon in Tillamook, Oregon: No one knows how this Pacific Northwest spruce tree came to have so many trunks. Once you have thoroughly examined everything to your satisfaction, answer the three (3) questions below to help you assess the information you gathered and come to a determination. Save The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus. (Some evolutionary theorists suppose that "arboreal adaptation" is what laid the groundwork in primates for the evolution of the human mind.). True or Fake? 1. Yes, a tree octopus an aquatic animal that allegedly lives in trees. We’re aware that these uncertain times are limiting many aspects of life. An intelligent and inquisitive being (it has the largest brain-to-body ratio for any mollusk), the tree octopus explores its arboreal world by both touch and sight. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Absolutely True Facts about the Pacific Tree Octopus: A Short Story. (Octopus paxarbolis) is its scientific name (definitely fake). We’re not sure if it’s because the initial evidence was compelling or the fact that our state is full of mystery and wonder, but either way, it makes for a great story. 1.) These creatures supposedly begin their lives like any other octopus, as an egg in the water. Their habitat lies on the Eastern side of the Olympic mountain range, adjacent to Hood Canal. They will explore a given website to look for questionable facts. Look especially at the following elements, and discuss with your partner how they make the site more or less convincing: Style & Layout:
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